The Med Shed

Personal Assistant

THE WORKING DAY

You work at Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust as personal assistant to the chief executive. Your day starts at 9am.

Your first task is to organise today’s workload for the team secretaries, ensuring they have all the information they need to type up letters, file documents and photocopy material for staff members. Next, you deal with the chief executive’s emails and post. Some of these are queries you are able to deal with yourself, others you put to one side to discuss with the chief executive later.

You book the boardroom for next week’s monthly board meeting, arrange refreshments and send out the agenda and other documents needed for the meeting. Next, you do a quick stock check and order new stationery, updating your budget spreadsheet in the process. No two days are ever the same and you enjoy the fast pace and responsibility of your position.

DOES THIS SOUND LIKE ME?

You’re organised, responsible and reliable. You can work under your own initiative but also operate as part of a team. You’re good at leading others and have excellent communication skills.

WHAT'S NEXT?

You’ll usually need a good range of GCSEs (or equivalent) to demonstrate basic education and will probably be considering taking a secretarial or business services qualification at college as your next step. Then, you’ll need to gain administrative work experience — preferably within the NHS. Alternatively, instead of going to college, you could look at a job or an apprenticeship in the NHS.

Obtaining a good level of education will certainly help you obtain a role as a personal assistant, especially if you’re taking secretarial or business services qualifications to develop your secretarial skills. After college you could apply for a job or a relevant business or administration-related apprenticeship in the NHS.

For apprenticeship and trainee vacancies, visit NHS Jobs and Gov.uk Apprenticeships.